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Puccini’s La bohème

October 26 @ 12:00 am - October 30 @ 12:00 am

$20 – $98

Tickets are available at the Stevens Center of the UNCSA (405 4th St NW, Winston-Salem, NC 27101). You can call the Stevens Center Box Office at (336) 721-1945 or you can purchase tickets at the door, one hour before curtain.
October 26th at 8:00 PM 10/26 Tickets Pre Pay Parking 10/26 Pre Pay Parking
October 28th at 2:00 PM 10/28 Tickets Pre Pay Parking 10/28 Pre Pay Parking
October 30th at 7:30 PM 10/30 Tickets Pre Pay Parking 10/30 Pre Pay Parking
La bohème, the passionate, timeless, and indelible story of love among young artists in Paris, can stake its claim as the world’s most popular opera. It has a marvelous ability to make a powerful first impression and to reveal unsuspected treasures after dozens of hearings. At first glance, La Bohème is the definitive depiction of the joys and sorrows of love and loss; on closer inspection, it reveals the deep emotional significance hidden in the trivial things—a bonnet, an old overcoat, a chance meeting with a neighbor—that make up our everyday lives.

Piedmont Opera now offers a Pre-Paid option on Fourth and Poplar Street. You can purchase your prepaid parking for the night of your performance above. Learn More About Pre-Paid Parking Pre Pay Parking Info

Details

Start:
October 26 @ 12:00 am
End:
October 30 @ 12:00 am
Cost:
$20 – $98
Event Category:

Venue

The Stevens Center of the UNCSA
405 4th St NW
Winston-Salem, NC 27101 United States
Phone:
336.725.7101

Organizer

Piedmont Opera
Phone:
336.725.7101
Email:
info@piedmontopera.org
Cast & Creative

Mimi: Yulia Lysenko

Rodolfo: Adam Diegel

Musetta: Megan Cleaveland

Marcello: Michael Redding

Schaunard: Robert Balonek

Colline: Richard Ollarsaba

Benoit: Donald Hartmann

Alcindoro: Donald Hartmann

 

Creative Team:

Conductor: James Allbritten
Stage Director: Steven LaCosse
Lighting Designer: Norman Coates
Wig and Make-up Designer: Martha Ruskai
Scenery Supplied by: University of Cincinnati, College-Conservatory of Music
Scenery Coordinated by: Bill Volz
Costume Designer: Glenn A. Breed, Wardrobe Witchery
Costumes Coordinated by: Mahealani Jones
Props Master: Lauren Reinhartsen
Supertitle Creations: Dr. Nancy E. Goldsmith

Libretto

Like a stage play or a movie, an opera starts with words — thousands of words. An opera’s words are called its libretto, whereas, in a stage play, the words are called the script, and in a movie they’re called the screenplay.

Libretto means “little book” in Italian, and that’s precisely what it is; your average libretto is scarcely thicker than a TV Guide. But because singing a sentence takes about three times longer than saying it, a “little book,” when set to music, becomes a full evening in the theater. (Dummies.com)

Find the libretto for La bohème here.

Synopsis

La bohème

Opera in four acts by Giacomo Puccini; libretto by Giuseppe Giacosa and Luigi Illica, based on Henri Murger’s book, La Vie de Bohème. Premiered at the Teatro Reggio, Turin, February 1, 1896.

CHARACTERS

RODOLFO, a poet…………………………………………………………Tenor
MARCELLO, a painter……………………………………………………..Baritone
COLLINE, a philosopher…………………………………………………. .Bass
SCHAUNARD, a musician…………………………………………………..Baritone
BENOIT, a landlord………………………………………………………….Bass
ALCINDORO, a state councilor and follower of Musetta………………….Bass
PARPIGNOL, an itinerant toy vendor………………………………………Tenor
CUSTOM-HOUSE SERGEANT…………………………………………….Bass
MUSETTA, a grisette……………………………………………………….Soprano
MIMI, a maker of embroidery……………………………………………….Soprano
Students, working girls, citizens, shopkeepers, street venders, soldiers, waiters, boys, girls, etc.

Time: About 1830.
Place: Latin Quarter, Paris.

“Bohemia is a stage in artistic life; it is the preface to the Academy, the Hotel Dieu, or the Morgue . . . Today, as of old, every man who enters on an artistic career, without any other means of livelihood than his art itself, will be forced to walk in the paths of Bohemia”

  • From Scènes de la vie de Bohème by Henri Murger

Act I: A Studio in Paris, December 24, evening.

In their Latin Quarter garret, the near-destitute artist Marcello and poet Rodolfo try to keep warm on Christmas Eve by feeding the stove with pages from Rodolfo’s latest drama. They are soon joined by their roommates—Colline, a philosopher, and Schaunard, a musician, who brings food, fuel, and funds he has collected from an eccentric student. While they celebrate their unexpected fortune, the landlord, Benoit, comes to collect the rent. After making the older man drunk, they urge him to tell of his flirtations. When he does, they throw him out in mock indignation at his infidelity to his wife. As his friends depart to celebrate at the Café Momus, Rodolfo remains behind to finish writing an article but promises to join them later. There is another knock at the door—it is Mimì, a pretty neighbor, whose candle has gone out on the stairway. As she enters the room she suddenly feels faint. Rodolfo gives her a sip of wine, then helps her to the door and relights her candle. Mimì realizes she lost her key when she fainted, and as the two search for it, both candles are blown out. Rodolfo finds the key and slips it into his pocket. In the moonlight, he takes Mimì’s hand and tells her about his dreams. She recounts her life alone in a lofty garret, embroidering flowers and waiting for the spring. Rodolfo’s friends are heard outside, calling him to join them. He responds that he is not alone and will be along shortly. Happy to have found each other, Mimì and Rodolfo leave, arm in arm, for the café.

Act 2: Outside the Café Momus.

Amid the shouts of street hawkers near the Café Momus, Rodolfo buys Mimì a bonnet and introduces her to his friends. They all sit down and order supper. The toy vendor Parpignol passes by, besieged by children. Marcello’s former sweetheart, Musetta, makes a noisy entrance on the arm of the elderly but wealthy Alcindoro. The ensuing tumult reaches its peak when, trying to gain Marcello’s attention, she loudly sings the praises of her own popularity. Sending Alcindoro off on a pretext, she finally falls into Marcello’s arms. Soldiers march by the café, and as the bohemians fall in behind, the returning Alcindoro is presented with the check.

Act 3: The Barriére d’Enfer, one of the Paris toll gates. A cold, wet February dawn.

At dawn on the snowy outskirts of Paris, a customs official admits farm women to the city.  Guests are heard drinking and singing within a tavern. Mimì arrives, searching for Marcello.  When the painter appears, she tells him of her distress over Rodolfo’s incessant jealousy.  She says she believes it is best that they part. Rodolfo, who has been asleep in the tavern, comes outside.  Mimì hides nearby, though Marcello thinks she has left.  Rodolfo tells his friend that he wants to separate from Mimì, blaming her flirtatiousness.  Pressed for the real reason, he breaks down, saying that her coughing can only grow worse in the poverty they share. Overcome with emotion, Mimì comes forward to say goodbye to her lover.  Marcello runs back into the tavern upon hearing Musetta’s laughter.  While Mimì and Rodolfo recall past happiness, Marcello returns with Musetta, quarreling about her flirting with a customer.  They hurl insults at each other and part, but Mimì and Rodolfo decide to remain together until spring.

Act 4: The Studio. Early Summer.

Months later in the garret, Rodolfo and Marcello are now separated from their girlfriends.  They try to work and pretend to be happy, but neither can forget the memory of the girl they love.  Colline and Schaunard bring a meager meal of bread and herring.  To lighten their spirits the four stage a dance, which turns into a mock duel. At the height of the hilarity Musetta bursts in with news that Mimì is outside, too weak to come upstairs.  As Rodolfo runs to her aid, Musetta relates how Mimì begged to be taken to Rodolfo to die.  She is made as comfortable as possible, while Musetta asks Marcello to sell her earrings for medicine and Colline goes off to pawn his overcoat.  Left alone, Mimì and Rodolfo recall their meeting and their first happy days, but she is seized with violent coughing.  When the others return, Musetta gives Mimì a muff to warm her hands and prays for her life.  Mimì slowly drifts into unconsciousness.  Schaunard realizes that she is dead, and Rodolfo is left desperate.

 

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